palm:

snow by Batrakov on Flickr.
oceansing:

Day 105: Oregon Coast Range by lorenkerns on Flickr.
palm:

湘西德夯苗寨 by 向 柯瑾 on Flickr.
I tell my students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else. This is not just a grab-bag candy game.’

Toni Morrison (via thisislove)

(commoventeから)

palm:

untitled by Cody Cobb on Flickr.
A long time ago I learned not to explain things to people. It misleads them into thinking they’re entitled to know everything I do.

Lisa Kleypas, Dreaming of You (via larmoyante)
museumuesum:

RICHARD LONG
FIVE PATHS
GALERIA MÁRIO SEQUEIRA BRAGA PORTUGAL 2004
freudist:

good enough for now
wildcat2030:

Humans Already Use Way, Way More Than 10 Percent of Their Brains -It’s a complex, constantly multi-tasking network of tissue—but the myth persists.  - By now, perhaps you’ve seen the trailer for the new sci-fi thriller Lucy. It starts with a flurry of stylized special effects and Scarlett Johansson serving up a barrage of bad-guy beatings. Then comes Morgan Freeman, playing a professorial neuroscientist with the obligatory brown blazer, to deliver the film’s familiar premise to a full lecture hall: “It is estimated most human beings only use 10 percent of the brain’s capacity. Imagine if we could access 100 percent. Interesting things begin to happen.” Johansson as Lucy, who has been kidnapped and implanted with mysterious drugs, becomes a test case for those interesting things, which seem to include even more impressive beatings and apparently some kind of Matrix-esque time-warping skills. Of course, the idea that “you only use 10 percent of your brain” is, indeed, 100 hundred percent bogus. Why has this myth persisted for so long, and when is it finally going to die? (via Humans Already Use Way, Way More Than 10 Percent of Their Brains - Sam McDougle - The Atlantic)